Why You Should Reconsider Your Hiring Processes
October 2018
[Back to newsletter]

Home Page
Cash Management
Business Checking
Business Savings
Business Loans
Remote Deposit Capture
REO Properties
Contact Us
Privacy Policy


Subscribe to our Newsletter
Why You Should Reconsider Your Hiring Processes
How to make sure your business’s biggest bet pays off

In business, there is perhaps no bigger or more important step toward success than getting the right people on board. The hiring process can be something of a gamble even for the well-initiated. Bringing in the wrong employee may not stunt the growth of your business so much as it takes it back a couple of steps. To avoid finding yourself in a tough spot because you bet on the wrong horse, you may want to consider reevaluating your hiring processes and changing it to better meet your needs.

Be clear about what you want

If your business has an immediate need that must be filled, you might be inclined to rush to the job boards with a quickly thrown-together job description and hope that you cast a wide enough net to catch a hungry candidate or two. Author and former Fortune 500 executive Lisa Quast writes for Forbes that this approach should be avoided at all costs. Instead, you should take the time necessary to craft a well-drawn job description, even if that includes taking the time to introspectively consider what you’re looking for in a candidate. By sketching a clearer picture of the kind of person you need for a role, you’re more likely to find an employee who will complete the picture perfectly.

Put candidates through the paces

Once you’ve narrowed the field down to a few attractive candidates, you’ll begin the interview process. You might get a good enough feeling about a candidate with one interview, but Hire Senior Product Manager Berit Hoffmann writes that a study conducted by Google determined that four interviews allowed the company to predict whether a candidate was right for the job 86 percent of the time. Hoffman notes that the number of interviews should be catered to meet the size of your business, importance of the role and the competitiveness of the industry in which you work — in some cases, you may be just fine with a good gut feeling after one interview.

Don’t be overly picky

It might seem counterintuitive to recommend against being demanding when it comes to choosing an ideal employee, but Glassdoor’s Stacy Pollack suggests that a tendency toward being too exacting may cause you to miss out on a prime candidate. To counteract this, Pollack recommends foregoing the typical laser focus on education and industry experience in favor of reading an applicant’s less tangible skills. Instead of leaning immediately toward a candidate with a degree from a university with more name recognition or a greater number of years in your industry, see how your candidates perform in the interview. A potential employee who demonstrates a great deal of drive, a willingness to learn and the capacity for growth may ultimately be the better choice than someone who has become more set in their ways and is less malleable to your vision.

By reconsidering the way you hire, you may put yourself in a better position to attract quality candidates that will help grow your business. Consider your needs, be open to change and learn from past mistakes, and you’ll be on your way to a complete and successful workforce.



[PRINTER FRIENDLY VERSION]
Published by Heritage Bank of Nevada
Copyright © 2018 Heritage Bank of Nevada All rights reserved.
Includes copyrighted material of IMakeNews, Inc. and its suppliers.
Disclaimer - All content contained in this newsletter is for informational purposes only and should not be relied upon to make any financial, accounting, tax, legal or other related decisions. Each person must consider his or her objectives, risk tolerances and level of comfort when making financial decisions and should consult a competent professional advisor prior to making any such decisions. Any opinions expressed through the content in this newsletter are the opinions of the particular author only.
ARCHIVE
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018

[MORE]


Powered by IMN